Nisonin

Nison-in is a Tendai Buddhist temple complex in Kyoto, Japan. It is famous for its twin images of Shaka and Amida and a popular destination during the Japanese maple viewing season. Japan web magazine’s recommend Nisonin DATA Address: 27 Saganisonin Monzenchojincho, Ukyo-ku Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 616-8425 Japan Access: City Bus …

Seigantoji

  Seigantoji Sanjunoto             Japan web magazine’s recommend Seigantoji DATA Address: Nachisan Nachikatsura-cho, Higashimuro-gun, Wakayama Transport: 30min from JR [Kii katsuura] Stn by Kumano kotsu bus to [Nachisan]. Walk from Takimae bus stop or Jinja teramae stop. Phone: 0735-52-5311 Seigantoji

Chusonji

  Hiraizumi, Chusonji temple Chusonji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Hiraizumi, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. It is the main temple of the Tendai sect in the Tohoku (northeastern Japan). It was founded in 850 by En-nin.   Konjikido (Golden Hall) is one of two buildings that survive from the original …

Nikko

  Shrines and Temples of Nikko Mount. Futara(二荒山(男体山))   Nikko Toshogu (東照宮 / にっこうとうしょうぐう) 「三猿」Mizaru, Iwazaru, Kikazaru.   Nikkozan Rinnoji (輪王寺/ にっこうざん りんのうじ)   Futarasan jinja shrine (二荒山神社 / ふたらさんじんじゃ)   Japan web magazine’s recommend Nikko Toshogu DATA Address: 2301 Sandai, Nikko-shi, Tochigi Access (By train): Take the Tobu-Nikko line from Tobu …

Kiyomizudera

Kiyomizudera Kiyomizu-dera is an independent Buddhist temple in Kyoto. It was founded in the late Nara period (778) on the site of the Otowa Waterfall in the wooded hills by Enchin (延鎮), and the temple takes its name from the waterfall. “Kiyomizu” means clear water in Japanese. In 1994, the …

Tenryuji

Tenryuji Tenryuji is a Zen temple in the Arashiyama area of Kyoto, and it is the first-ranked of the Five Great Zen Temples of Kyoto. The temple was established in 1339 by Shogun Ashikaga Takauji, and like many other temples burnt down several times over its history. But the garden …

Kinkakuji

Kinkakuji Kinkakuji (金閣寺 Golden Pavilion) is a Zen temple formally known as Rokuonji(鹿苑寺). It was built in 1397 as a retirement place for Shogun Yoshimitsu Ashikaga (足利義満), and was converted into a Zen temple after Yoshimitsu’s death in 1408.                            Japan web magazine’s recommend Kinkakuji …